16 Penang Food Favourites and Where to Eat Them

Penang is the food capital of Malaysia and described by many an uber driver as a ‘food paradise’. For such a small island, the quality and diversity of the culinary scene is incredible and the influences of Penang’s rich history can be found in every dish. We’ve spent 3 weeks eating our way around Penang, seeking out the best food and where to find find it.

  1. Char Kway Teow – This literally translates as ‘stir fried rice cake strips’, but it’s much better than it sounds. Thick strips of rice noodles are fried over a high heat with bean sprouts, chilli, prawns, egg, cockles, chopped Chinese chives and Chinese sausage or chicken, and seasoned with light and dark soy sauce and belachan. It’s kind of like a Malaysian version of Pad Thai and it’s Flic’s favourite dish in all of Penang. The best char kway teow we found was served by a woman we called ‘noodle lady’ (that’s probably not her real name) opposite the 7 Eleven on Chulia Street in Georgetown.char-kwey-teow
  2. Tandoori Chicken – What? That’s Indian food! Yes, we realise that tandoori chicken is traditionally an Indian dish, but Penang serves the best tandoori chicken we’ve ever tasted. Flic’s been to India 4 times, so we reckon she knows what she’s talking about. Our favourite place to eat tandoori chicken, and much more, is the 24 hour restaurant Nasi Dalcha Kassim Mustafa in Little India.tandoori-chicken
  3. Apam Balik – Somewhere between a pancake and a taco, apam balik is made from a coconut milk batter and fried in a deep pan in a thin layer. The cooked shell is folded into a pocket and traditionally filled with sugar, crushed peanuts and creamed corn. Nutella and banana ones the most! Our favourite apam balik is from a hawker stall on the main road in Batu Ferringhi.
  4. Beef Rendang – Traditionally an Indonesian dish, rendang is a rich, dry curry that balances a small amount of coconut milk with the strong flavours of ginger, galangal, turmeric leaves, lemongrass, garlic, shallots, chillies, cinnamon, star anise and a bunch of other spices. Basically, it’s everything you want in a curry. The Penang twist on rendang is to pile on the sugar, which isn’t surprising in a country that insists on adding sugar syrup to your pineapple juice. The best beef rendang we’ve ever had can be found at Helena Cafe in Batu Ferringhi.beef-rendang
  5.  Cendol – This is a bit of a weird one and it’s not something either of us really like, but the locals seem to love it! Penang’s cendol (sometimes spelled chendol or chendul) is famous and we think it’s worth trying whilst you’re here. Rice flour is mixed with green food colouring and formed into little worm-like jellies. These are served with shaved ice, coconut/soya milk, palm sugar (of course) and red beans. It’s refreshing on a hot day, but we’d rather have Maxim’s Gelato. Try Penang Road Famous Teochew Chendul Ice Kacang for a big old bowl of strange.cendol
  6. Lor Bak – You’re going to like this one. Minced belly pork is marinated in 5 spice, then wrapped in a bean curd skin and deep fried. It’s the ultimate sausage. After frying, it’s chopped into bite sized pieces and served with a chilli dipping sauce. We love it, and we love it even more if it’s from the Lor Bak stand in CF Food Court.lor-bak
  7.  Bamboo Charcoal Noodle – Apparently these noodles have untold health benefits and over 400 different minerals. We’re not too concerned by this, but we think they taste pretty amazing! One of our favourite noodle shops in Georgetown – Yeap Noodles – make their own fresh noodles every day and serve a mean bamboo charcoal noodle in seaweed soup. They also sell some excellent chilli noodles that are insanely spicy. We ate a lot of these in Georgetown because most tourists were unable to handle the heat and would have to order a second, more tame dish, and pass the chilli noodles on to us!charcoal-bamboo-noodle
  8.  Double Roast Pork – Not the most imaginatively named dish, but probably one of the most delicious things we’ve ever eaten. Sorry, Fat Duck. The double roast pork is soft, succulent, sweet, salty, chewy and crispy in all the right places. This is not just a recommendation of a dish, but of a specific restaurant – Tek Sen. We’ve never seen Tek Sen mentioned in any guide books or food blogs, but it’s famous amongst Georgetown locals. After a while, we stopped asking for restaurant recommendations because everyone would tell us to go to Tek Sen. The sign is faded, but you’ll be able to spot it by the huge queue of diners waiting outside. It’s so popular that you’re given a menu whilst in the queue and asked to order before you sit down to save time. Get there early because the double roast pork is their most sought after dish, and it sells out quickly!
  9.  Fried Oyster – This is Nick’s favourite thing to eat in Penang. Succulent fresh oysters are garnished with coriander, parsley and basil, then mixed with a batter made from plain flour, tapioca flour, rice flour and egg. The omelet is seasoned with soya sauce and fish sauce before being fried to gooey perfection. Nick’s favourite place to eat fried oyster is the hawker stall in Long Beach Food Court in Batu Ferringhi.
  10.  Assam Laksa – Differing hugely to the coconut based laksa we all know and love, Penang assam laksa is a hot and sour fish based noodle broth that offers a clean, minty mouthful. Assam is Malay for tamarind, which is what gives this laksa its sour taste. The dish varies from hawker to hawker, but usually incorporates poached and flaked mackerel, lemongrass, galangal, chilli, mint, pineapple, onion, shrimp paste, rice noodles and a sprinkling of beautiful, fiery bunga kantan (torch ginger flower). The best assam laksa in Penang, without a doubt, is cooked by the side of the road at the bottom on Penang Hill.
  11. Mee Rebus – Literally translating as ‘boiled noodles’, this doesn’t sound like the most exciting thing on this list, but Penang never disappoints when it comes to food. Yellow egg noodles are smothered in a sweet, spicy gravy made from shrimp broth, lemongrass, shallots, galangal, salam leaf (similar to bay leaf), kafir lime leaves, palm sugar and salt. This delicious concoction is topped with whatever you have to hand, preferably some beansprouts, lime juice, fried tofu, shredded chicken, Chinese celery, spring onions, green chilli, bombay potatoes, fried shallots, shrimp and some green leaves. Our favourite mee rebus is from a hawker stall on the corner of Armenian Street and Lorong Soo Hong in Georgetown.mee-rebus
  12. Nasi Lemak – Considered Malaysia’s national dish, nasi lemak is rice boiled with coconut milk and pandan leaves, topped with spicy sambal sauce, anchovies and boiled egg and wrapped into a pyramid shaped package in a banana leaf. Piles of these cute little parcels can be found at most cafes and hawker stalls in the morning because nasi lemak is usually eaten for breakfast. We prefer it as an afternoon snack, and like to grab one from the teh and kopi stall on the corner of Jalan Pintal Tali and Jalan Dr Lim Chwee Leon, along with Nick’s favourite drink – a bag of sugary teh tarik (best avoided if you are at all concerned about diabetes).
  13. Pasembur – Probably the least healthy salad you’ll ever eat. Pasembur is a selection of deep fried seafood, topped with julienned cucumber, potato, bean curd, turnip and bean sprouts. The ‘salad’ is smothered in a very sweet, thick potato based sauce. We found the sauce to be too sweet most of the time, but the best pasember in Penang can be found at the Gurney Drive Hawker Centre (although we did think it was a little overpriced).pasembur
  14. Popiah – Often referred to as a fresh spring roll, once you try popiah you’ll wonder why spring rolls are ever deep fried! It’s made with a paper thin crepe-like skin, which is filled with finely grated and steamed turnip, jicama, bean sprouts, green beans, grated carrots, lettuce, sliced tofu, chopped peanuts, fried shallots, shredded omelet and a delicious sauce of hoi sin, chilli, shrimp paste and garlic. Our favourite popiah is made in the evenings, down a small alleyway opposite the 7 Eleven on Chulia Street in Georgetown.
  15. Rojak – The term ‘rojak’ is Malay for ‘mixture’. Bite sized chunks of cucumber, pineapple, turnip, jicama, mango, apple, guava and jambu air are smothered in the same sweet brown sauce as pasembur and sprinkled with crushed peanuts and ground pepper. We’re not a fan of the sauce because we find it too sweet, but those with a sweet tooth are bound to enjoy this Penang speciality. Pick up a plate at the CF Food Court in Georgetown.rojak
  16. Satay – Probably Malaysia’s most famous dish and beloved by all. Strips of tender beef, chicken or pork are marinated in a mixture of lemongrass, shallots, garlic, galangal, ginger, chilli, ground turmeric (which gives satay its distinct yellow colour), coriander, cumin, soy sauce and brown sugar. The meat is skewered and cooked over hot coals, or a wood fire, until cooked through and slightly charred. Malaysians often brush coconut milk over the skewers during cooking, making it extra delicious and preventing the the outer edges from burning too much. Once cooked through, the satay are served with a peanut based sauce of dry roasted peanuts, garlic, chilli, coconut milk, fish sauce, soy sauce, sugar and tamarind paste. Delicious! Our favourite satay can be found at Seaview Sizzle in Batu Ferringhi.satay

Choosing the tastiest food and the best places to eat them in Penang has been a difficult yet delicious task. We hope that our ‘hard’ work will help you to explore the island and make the most out of your time in this magnificent place. If you think we’ve missed something, or you find a great restaurant or hawker stall that we haven’t mentioned, please get in touch and let us know! We welcome any excuse to return to Penang, but for now, our stomachs are rumbling and the char kway teow is calling…


Not quite paradise, but still quite nice – travelling Langkawi on a budget

Langkawi is undoubtedly a spectacular place. We wouldn’t go as far as calling it a paradise, as most travel sites do, but it’s worth stopping off there to refresh your soul as you make your way around South East Asia, especially if you’ve just come from the crazy urban hotbox of Georgetown.

We arrived a little baffled as to the best way to spend our time there. It’s not the kind of place you can just hop on a bus and hope for the best, mainly because there are no buses (it seems public transport is illegal here) and the taxi fares are extortionate. Langkawi is crying out for Uber, but that’s another story. Here’s a few ways to get the most out of your stay and keep within your budget.

How to Get There

Langkawi is an archipelago of over 99 islands, and most backpackers arrive by boat, taking the 3 hour ferry from Penang for 80RM. The ferry leaves at 8:30am and 2:00pm each day. Tickets are available online, or from the ticket office which is a 2 minute walk from the ferry terminal. We took this one way, but the sea was so rough that Nick spent the entire time outside, spewing up 3 full sick bags. On the plus side, they did show Ip Man 3 on TV.

If you prefer not to make this gut wrenching trip, you can get pretty cheap local flights from within Malaysia, as well as some international flights via Air Asia. We found that flying from Penang was about the same price as taking the ferry, and only takes 20 minutes. You do the maths.

If you’re coming to Langkawi the other way, from Thailand, you can take a speedboat from Koh Lipe. It’s a little pricey at 140RM each, but it only takes an hour and the sea was pleasantly calm for our trip. Plus, you have an excuse to visit Koh Lipe with it’s crystal clear waters and quality pancake scene.

Where to Stay

Langkawi can seem a bit anti-backpacker with it’s overpriced resorts and stately hotels lining the coast. Yet it is possible to have a good night’s sleep on a tight budget here. We strongly recommend that you stay at the cosy, clean and welcoming Soluna Guesthouse near Pantai Cenang. Tucked away amongst gorgeous rice paddies, complete with white heron and water buffalo, the main shopping strip and long sandy beach is only a 5 minute walk away, through some fields, past clucking chickens and cats lazing in the sun.

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Check their website for current prices, but when we stayed it was only 20RM for a dorm bed, or 45RM for a double room with a fan. They also have private A/C options, but Langkawi gets cool at night so we didn’t go for this. They’re not on booking.com, so you can just turn up. However, to avoid disappointment we advise you call or email them to book in advance. Oh, and they have hot showers too, in case you weren’t convinced already.

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What to Eat

As you’ve probably noticed by now, food is a priority for us wherever we go. Langkawi definitely loses a few paradise points for the lack of hawkers and it’s overpriced and uninspiring restaurants, especially on the main Pantai Cenang strip. Most blogs push the bbq seafood here, and we have no doubt that it tastes great. However, when the live seafood is priced per kg, it isn’t going to be kind to your wallet.

Yet you can still get some great meals here, and if you’re strapped for cash, we urge you to visit Bella Restaurant at Pantai Cenang. Here you’ll find mostly local food at fair prices. Breakfast here is a must – sip teh tarik and tuck in to  some nasi lemak, or order a kopi and treat yourself to some roti canai (Malayisan style pancakes) with a variety of flavours, including the winning banana and nutella. All for about 5RM too!

If you find it a cop out to eat in the same place all the time, explore the main strip for something that takes your fancy, and there sure is plenty of choice. A reasonable price per dish is 10-15 RM, although this is definitely unreasonable compared to elsewhere in Malaysia. It’s easy to get ripped off here, so always check the menu before taking a seat.

You should also try to visit a night market during your stay – check Travelfish for days and times. Here you can stock up on satay, pancakes, murtabak and that Malaysian delicacy, the deep fried burger! These markets, with their hawkers and hustlers, are bad for your health but great for your budget with each dish costing around 1-2RM.

night-market-langkawi-malaysianight-market-langkawi-malaysia-2

You’ve probably heard that Langkawi is duty free, and this is correct. However, don’t go expecting bargain booze on every corner (actually, the best corner for cheap beer in Malaysia is Georgetown’s Beer Corner). Remember, this is Malaysia, not Calais in the 90’s, so alcohol is frowned upon in most places. The majority of Malaysians come to Langkawi to avoid paying taxes on kitchenware and chocolate, which is interesting but doesn’t exactly scream ‘PARTYYY!’. Drinking out will cost about the same as anywhere else in Malaysia, and the discount on alcohol in shops is usually quite disappointing. Anyway, if you want to get tipsy, your best bet is to have a few tinnies on the beach and avoid the bars.

What To Do

So, you’ve arrived, settled in to Soluna and checked out Pantai Cenang. We know what you’re thinking – the beach is ok, fairly long with off white sand, certainly better than England (although Langkawi often feels a lot like Cornwall). Still, you don’t want to pay to rent a deck chair and a parasol, and the watersports are lacklustre and overpriced. It’s probably raining too, just like Cornwall,  so the beach is not looking like a viable option for the next couple of days. Yeah, we’ve been here too.

Think you can tell the difference between Langkawi and Cornwall? Take our quiz!

What you want to do now is go back to Soluna and hire a scooter (usually about 35RM per day) or a car for about 60RM per day. We chose to hire a car because of the constant rain, but scooters are also rather nifty for exploring some of the smaller villages. Now you’ve got some wheels you are free to explore the interior of the island, which is where Langkawi’s true beauty lies.

First off, head out to the Langkawi Sky Cab for some awesome views of the island. It’ll cost you 45RM for the Sky Cab entry fee, plus an extra 5RM to walk the iconic Sky Bridge. But for 50RM, you get to travel on Malaysia’s longest mono-line cable car (it’s never been made clear if there are any others in the country) to the top of Machincang Mountain. Up there, you’ll be 708 metres above sea level, affording views of the entire archipelago, and even some of the Thai islands on a clear day. We admit that waking the Sky Bridge sounds a bit cheesy, but it was a fantastic experience and our friend Tugce absolutely loved it – except for the lengthy climb back up to the cable car station!

If you visited the Sky Cab at the weekend and it’s crammed with tourists, the best thing to do is to come back another day. But don’t head home just yet – keep going past the Sky Cab site and follow the signs to the Seven Wells Waterfall. Here, you can hike up to the various stages of the waterfall and swim wherever you want. We found that it wasn’t too busy, and as most people forget to bring their swimming costume, you’ll have the pools to yourself! Just watch out for the monkeys because they stole our crisps.

There are two other notable waterfalls on the island that are definitely worth a visit. Temerun Waterfall is a sight to behold, with several rapid courses flowing over the side. It’s an easy climb up to the main basin, and here you’re likely to find the local lads daring each other to jump from the rocks. Join them if you’re feeling brave – we weren’t. Before you leave, make sure you try the beef rendang burrito from the shack in the car park. Mexican-Malayisan fusion at its finest!

Durian Perangin Waterfall was also a majestic wonder, although the lack of durians there may disappoint some visitors – not Flic though, she detests the king of fruit. We found this to be a quiet spot to refresh after a humid day of hiking, and there was plenty of space to have a picnic and even a few hawkers selling cheap hot corn and noodles.

The next place you should visit is Air Hangat Village for the salt water hot springs. The salt water, present thanks to the area’s low water table, is renowned for its health benefits. The locals claim it will ease your arthritis, boost your immune system and increase your general wellbeing. Whether this is medically verifiable or not, it’s rather satisfying to sit knee deep in a hot spring amid the lush green plains of the island. There’s also a reflexology path made of small stones, arranged to inflict maximum pain and discomfort. Walk what may be the world’s only homeopathic gauntlet if you dare.

If you still have more time with your moped, we recommend visiting Mount Raya (also known as Gunung Raya) in the middle of the island for a superb view of the archipelago. It will take you about 30 minutes to drive all the way to the top, past cheeky monkeys and fallen trees, an adventure in itself. At the summit, you can pay 10RM to take a lift to the viewing tower, and you get a free drink with this too. With the low clouds and our stingy temperaments, we didn’t do this, but we have heard from other travellers that it’s well worth it on a clear day.

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Of course, if the weather is fine and you have more time on the island, Langkawi’s beaches are worth a look. Whilst we believe that the word ‘paradise’ is used far too often in connection with Langkawi, there are some cool coves to consider. We recommend visiting the section of Tanjung Rhu Beach by Teluk Ewa Jetty. To get there,  you have to drive through Tanjung Rhu Resort and agree to their terms and conditions, but entry is absolutely free. When you reach the beach, you’ll have a cracking view of a few atolls rising from the waters and it’s usually fairly quiet there. Surprisingly, the Malaysian restaurants there offer delicious meals at some of the lowest prices we found on the island.

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We had a great time just driving around the island, through the tiny kampongs, past highlighter-pen-green rice paddies and thriving woodlands. Just like a day out in Cornwall, you’ll come across tourist attractions that may take your fancy every few kilometers. Usually they have low entry fees so you may as well check them out. Just a final word of warning – avoid the Langkawi Buffalo Park because it was awful. Little more than a walk through a cow shed, we were deeply underwhelmed by this rural ‘attraction’, although Flic enjoyed taking photos of the photogenic buffalo.

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